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LEARN-TO-ROW

 

Learn-to-Row

For more information about the LRC Learn-to-Row program or to sign up for classes please contact: louisvillerowingclub@gmail.com

LRC participates in national learn to row day.
This event is held annually the first Saturday in June. Please visit our news page for more information.

The Learn-to-row program seeks to provide introductory rowing lessons for beginners and continuing instruction to intermediate rowers. Lessons focus on proper technique and safety. Areas covered include sculling, sweep, and indoor rowing.

Small group or individual instruction is provided by by appointment or at the Downtown boathouse from April through September. Schedules vary by interest.

Sign-up for a class today to learn something new, improve your fitness, and enjoy miles of beautiful river.

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

 

SWEEP ROWING VS. SCULLING

Athletes with two oars – one in each hand – are scullers. There are three sculling events: the single – 1x (one person), the double – 2x (two) and the quad – 4x (four).

Athletes with only one oar are sweep rowers. Sweep boats may or may not carry a coxswain (pronounced cox-in) to steer and be the on-the-water coach. In boats without coxswains, one of the rowers steers by moving the rudder with his or her foot. Sweep rowers come in pairs with a coxswain (2+) and pairs without (2-), fours with a coxswain (4+) and fours without (4-) and the eight (8+), which always carries a coxswain. The eight is the fastest boat on the water. A world-level men's eight is capable of moving almost 14 miles per hour.

Athletes are identified by their seat in the boat. The athlete in bow is seat No. 1. That's the person who crosses the finish line first (which makes it easy to remember – first across the line is No. 1 seat). The person in front of the bow is No. 2, then No. 3, No. 4, No. 5, No. 6, No. 7 and No. 8, a.k.a. the stroke. The stroke of the boat must be a strong rower with excellent technique, since the stroke sets the rhythm and number of strokes per minute the rest of the crew must follow.

THE STROKE

The whole body is involved in moving a shell through the water. Although rowing tends to look like an upper body sport, the strength of the rowing stroke comes from the legs.

The stroke is made up of four parts: Catch, Drive, Finish, and Recovery. As the stroke begins, the rower is coiled forward on the sliding seat, with knees bent and arms outstretched. At the catch, the athlete drops the oarblade vertically into the water.

At the beginning of the drive, the body position doesn't change—all the work is done by the legs. As the upper body begins to uncoil, the arms begin their work, drawing the oarblades through the water. Continuing the drive, the rowers move their hands quickly into the body, which by this time is in a slight "layback" position, requiring strong abdominal muscles.

During the finish, the oar handle is moved down, drawing the oarblade out of the water. At the same time, the rower "feathers" the oar—turning the oar handle—so that the oarblade changes from a vertical position to a horizontal one. The oar remains out of the water as the rower begins recovery, moving the hands away from the body and past the knees. The body follows the hands and the sliding seat moves forward, until, knees bent, the rower is ready for the next catch.

EQUIPMENT

Oars

Oars move the boat through the water and act as balancers. Sweep oars are longer than sculling oars. The shaft of the oar is made of extremely lightweight carbon fiber instead of the heavier wood used years ago.

The Boats – Sculls and Shells

All rowing boats can be called shells. Rowing boats with scullers in them (each person having two oars) are called sculls, e.g., single scull, double scull, quadruple scull. So, all sculls are shells but not vice versa! Originally made of wood (and many beautifully crafted wooden boats are made today), newer boats—especially those used in competition—are made of honeycombed carbon fiber. They are light and appear fragile but are crafted to be strong and stiff in the water.

The smallest boat—the single racing scull—is approximately 27 feet long and as narrow as 10 inches across. At 58 feet, the eight is the longest boat on the water.

 


Coaches:

John Morrison
Bob Hurley
Dan MacLean
Graham Whatley
Mike Jones

 

 

 

US ROWING